Hiring and firing | Veterinary Economics

Hiring and firing

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FIRSTLINE: Jun 01, 2006
Tired of reseeding with new hires every year? It's time to cultivate perennials.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jun 01, 2006
A longtime staff member who's in her late 50s is having trouble learning our new computerized billing system. We don't want to fire her, but we need to replace her with someone who can handle our new technology. If we asked her to retire, would we risk an age-discrimination suit?
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Apr 01, 2006
You can't afford to skip this crucial step when recruiting employees.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Mar 01, 2006
By dvm360.com staff
What are the legal issues in hiring my 13-year-old daughter to work after school?
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Mar 01, 2006
How many warnings should I give, and when should I fire someone?
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FIRSTLINE: Feb 01, 2006
The doctor won't fire a problem employee. What can I do?
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Feb 01, 2006
Q What's the typical turnover rate for front-office team members? How do I know if my turnover's too high?
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jan 01, 2006
By dvm360.com staff
Background checks are not a waste of time or money. Here's why.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jan 01, 2006
By dvm360.com staff
Take these steps to document poor performance.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jan 01, 2006
Legally, you can terminate an at-will employee at any time. Of course, there are some exceptions.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Nov 01, 2005
Learn the potential legal ramifications of terminating an employee.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Oct 01, 2005
How do you know whether a newly hired team member is right for his or her job and, equally important, right for your practice? Many practice owners evaluate a new hire's job performance during a probationary period, which can last from 30 to 90 days.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Aug 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
Associates and support staff weigh in on the factors that attract them—and keep them on the job. Is your practice attractive to potential team members? (And is it equally attractive to potential buyers?)
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jun 01, 2005
Take these steps, and find that new person who fits with your team perfectly.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jun 01, 2005
Regardless of his or her work history, a staff member's first day on a new job can be intimidating. For some, it's so overwhelming and confusing that they don't return for a second day.