Help clients save big bucks by preventing osteoarthritis

Help clients save big bucks by preventing osteoarthritis

With a few preventive measures, clients can spend less and keep their dogs pain-free.
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Nov 01, 2010

Premium diets may cost a little more than generic brands of dog food, but they could save your clients a lot of money in the long run, says Veterinary Economics Editorial Advisory Board member Dr. Ernie Ward, owner of Seaside Animal Care in Calabash, N.C. Consider the following scenario: A client brings in a 40-pound dog with osteoarthritis, which is worsened by obesity. Here are the typical annual costs for treatment and pain management:

> $400 per year for one 75-mg chewable NSAID tablet per day ($199.99 for a 180-pill bottle from an online pharmacy)

> $180 per year for drug monitoring blood tests (this figure is based on industry averages)

> $216 per year for a daily nutritional supplement with chondroitin-glucosamine ($89.99 for a 150-pill bottle from an online pharmacy)

> $462 per year for therapeutic dry diet ($77 for a 30-pound bag that lasts two months)

That brings the annual cost of treatment to $1,258. Pretty steep, right? Now consider how much clients could save if they took preventive measures like feeding a premium diet and helping the dog maintain a lean body weight:

> $270 per year for premium maintenance diet ($30 for a 20-pound bag that lasts 40 days)

> $216 per year for a daily nutritional supplement with chondroitin-glucosamine ($89.99 for a 150-pill bottle from an online pharmacy)

That makes the annual cost of prevention $486, which amounts to $772 in savings per year. Think your clients would appreciate the extra spending cash? Help them see the benefits by heading to http://www.dvm360.com/wellnesschart and downloading a printable form featuring this scenario and other money-saving preventive measures clients can take.

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