Have no fear: Help is here

Have no fear: Help is here

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Apr 01, 2007

You're already familiar with the idea of hiring a relief veterinarian and the benefits that come along with doing so. But what about hiring a relief technician?


Rebecca Rose
For many years, practices have hired relief veterinarians to help. Now technicians are offering their skills and expertise as relievers too—and they're in demand. Your team members require time off for CE, vacation, and maternity leave. So the next time your practice needs an extra pair of hands, why not hire a relief technician?

Some advantages to this approach:

  • You pay only for the hours worked.
  • Relief technicians pay their own taxes.
  • They supply their own uniforms and equipment.
  • They require little if any training. Relievers are accustomed to walking in the door and hitting the floor running.

Visit http://vettechrelief.com/ for more information about hiring a relief technician and to find a relief technician for your hospital.

Rebecca Rose, CVT, is the practice manager at Town & Country Animal Hospital in Gunnison, Colo., and co-author of The Relief Veterinary Technician's Manual (Smith Veterinary Consulting, 2002).

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