Happiness causing job nesting in 2009

Happiness causing job nesting in 2009

Most workers plan on staying put at their jobs.
source-image
Jan 08, 2009
By dvm360.com staff

Given that the economy is a little bit shaky these days, it makes sense that employees will hunker down in their current jobs, right? Well, the latest study from SnagAJob.com and Ipsos Public Affairs shows that happiness is actually employees’ No. 1 motivator for staying put in their current jobs. And some aren’t as happy. According to the survey, 26 percent of works plan to job hunt this year—this percentage is holding steady from last year. Here’s more from the survey of employed workers:

  • Respondents said that if they were to lose their job tomorrow, their immediate household would survive for about 120 days before they would be unable to pay for basics like the mortgage or rent, food, and transportation.
  • Of those who do plan to look for a job, 19 percent said their greatest motivation in looking is a fear of layoffs.
  • Older workers are more likely to be on the job hunt this year. Of those who are at least 55 years old, 12 percent said they’ll be looking for a new job, up 5 percentage points from last year.

 

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