Gender: Who's the better boss?

Gender: Who's the better boss?

Does gender play a role when it comes to management skills in veterinary practice?
source-image
Aug 01, 2010
By dvm360.com staff
Sensible, respectful, and understanding: These are the traits associates say they look for and admire in a boss. So does it matter whether the boss is male or female? Desirable attributes, such as assertiveness or nurturing, aren’t gender-specific, even though they tend to be labeled as masculine or feminine. Bottom line: If you want to be the best boss, or work for the best, put stereotypes aside and start aggressively cultivating your own work character.
Data source: 2010 Veterinary Economics State of the Industry Study

The complete package:
Veterinary associates: Would you rather have a male or female boss?
Team members: Would you rather have a male or female boss?
Veterinary associates' reasons for preferring to work for women
Team members' reasons for preferring to work for women
Veterinary associates' reasons for preferring to work for men
Team members' reasons for preferring to work for men
What you said: Why women are better bosses
What you said: Why men are better bosses
Who's the boss now?
The breakdown in gender among the respondents

Hot topics on dvm360

Follow dvm360 on Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest

For quick updates and to touch base with the editors of dvm360, Veterinary Economics, Veterinary Medicine, and Firstline, and check us out on Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest.

Sell veterinary clients on your service

But you don't have to have butler-style service to win new clients and keep existing clients happy.

Why veterinarians should be more like a Louisiana shoeshiner

If my veterinary clients feel half as good as I did after visiting the 'Michael Jordan of shoeshines,' I'll be thrilled.

Texts from your veterinary clinic cat

If your clinic cat had a cell phone and opposable thumbs, what would he or she text you?

Learning goodbye: Veterinarians fill a void by focusing on end of life care

Veterinarians dedicating their careers to hospice and euthansia medicine may be pioneering the profession's next specialty—at clients' request.