Food for thought: Client objections to therapeutic diets

Food for thought: Client objections to therapeutic diets

There's no question that therapeutic diets benefit your patients, but they aren't cheap—and many clients are balking at the price.
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Aug 01, 2010
By dvm360.com staff
In this economy, when you recommend a therapeutic diet to a client, you've got to be ready to justify the added expense to the cash-strapped pet owner on the other side of the exam table by detailing the ways a special diet will help their pet. Our survey found that many veterinarians are facing more pushback in the recent past when they recommend therapeutic diets for non-life-threatening conditions.

The good news? When it comes to diets that help manage life-threatening conditions, most pet owners don’t hesitate to comply.

Data source: 2010 Veterinary Economics State of the Industry Study

The complete package:
Are clients resistant to purchasing therapeutic diets for non-life-threatening conditions, such as arthritis?
What are clients' objections to purchasing therapeutic diets for non-life-threatening conditions?
Are clients resistant to purchasing therapeutic diets for life-threatening conditions, such as renal failure?
What are clients' objections to purchasing therapeutic diets for life-threatening conditions?
What do you think about the price of most therapeutic diets?
The cost of wellness care

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