Finances: Why cats are better than dogs

Finances: Why cats are better than dogs

A smaller animal can yield bigger profits.
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Jul 01, 2009

Dr. Gary Norsworthy, DABVP (feline), owner of Alamo Feline Health Center in San Antonio, explains why cats beat dogs on the financial side of practice.

Feline practice is less seasonal. June and July were always the biggest months for dogs when Dr. Norsworthy practiced at a dog-and-cat practice. "Maybe it's because kids out of school could help haul the dog in," he says. Feline practice stays strong year-round.

Feline practice requires less inventory. Dr. Norsworthy used to carry a variety of sizes of flea and tick medication for dogs. For cats? "Just two sizes," he says.

Feline practice minimizes injuries. Because Dr. Norsworthy trains his team to handle cats properly, scratches and bites are minimal. And Dr. Norsworthy doesn't imagine he'll ever throw his back out lifting a cat from a carrier.

Feline practice requires less space. Exam rooms for cats can be small, and fewer employees can handle more patients.

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