Female breadwinners resent their husbands, study finds

Female breadwinners resent their husbands, study finds

But women in veterinary, medical professions report less resentment, more contentment
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Jul 09, 2008
By dvm360.com staff
veterinary marital strife
As more women enter the veterinary profession, more of them are becoming the primary breadwinners in their families. That's a mixed blessing, according to a survey by women-focused Web site BettyConfidential.com. Ninety-fine percent of primary breadwinner wives said they felt both empowered by their career success and resentful of their husbands' lack of success.

Marriages sometimes can't stand the pressure of that resentment, often born out of an unfair standard at home, says BettyConfidential co-founder Deborah Perry Piscione. "These women are empowered at work, but still return home to the burden of most of the work at home," Piscione says.

There's good news for female veterinarians and people doctors, however. Piscione says women in those professions were the most happy, having found a good balance between work life and family life.

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