Equine veterinarians love their jobs, but life balance is still tough

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Equine veterinarians love their jobs, but life balance is still tough

Lack of respect between generations of doctors, longer hours with no breaks, and not enough time for family and rest could take its toll on equine practitioners.
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Aug 01, 2011
By dvm360.com staff

The August issue of Veterinary Economics (coming soon online and in your mailbox) is jam-packed with great data for all veterinarians, including equine practitioners. Here are even more statistics gems on life balance issues for equine doctors.

They show that, while equine practitioners are generally happy with their careers, they may not be taking the breaks for family and personal time they need to stay engaged and energized for practice.

 

 

Click on the page numbers below for more.

Equine veterinarians enjoy their jobs and appreciate their employers, compared to the competitors. But a significant percentage may not be giving enough time and energy to other parts of their life, and that may harm their future careers and health. Check out the data below:

 

 

 

 

 

Click on the page numbers below for more.

Some veterinarians of an earlier generation don't seem to think much of their young compatriots—and vice versa.

 

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