Employees' mental status: scared

Employees' mental status: scared

The recession is affecting everyone's stress levels, from management on down.
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Apr 02, 2009
By dvm360.com staff
A new survey of 300 married, working couples shows just how hard the recession is hitting companies and families across the U.S. The study, conducted by Florida State University’s College of Business, found that employees are feeling more stress, more pressure from management, and are witnessing more incivility. Here are some of the findings:
  • More than 70 percent of respondents said the recession has significantly increased stress levels of employees and coworkers. Fifty-five percent said management has grown increasingly demanding.
  • Eighty percent of employees are nervous about their long-term financial well-being.
  • More than 40 percent reported an increase in workplace activities like backstabbing, sucking up, and jockeying for position.

In addition to on-the-job stress, Americans are feeling the financial pinch on the home front. More than 70 percent of respondents admitted to making significant spending changes, including a decision to limit or eliminate the purchase of non-essential items.

 

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