Educating clients about preventing zoonotic diseases

Educating clients about preventing zoonotic diseases

'Tis the season for creepy crawlies to worm their way into clients' and pets' lives. Remind clients of these disease prevention tips.
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Jul 02, 2008
By dvm360.com staff

Help clients keep their families safe from infection with these common-sense strategies.

Wash hands. Tell clients they can reduce the likelihood they'll contract a zoonotic disease by simply washing their hands with soap and water after being outside. Hand washing also reduces the risk of disease transmission after a family member has been bitten or scratched by a pet.

Don't play rough. To keep from getting bites and scratches, clients should avoid playing rough with the family pet. If a family member is bitten or scratched by a pet, immediately wash the affected area.

Check for ticks. If people spend a lot of time outside, encourage them to check themselves for ticks when they head indoors.

Keep an eye on the kids. Parents should be sure their kids keep dirt, grass, sand, and other objects away from their mouths. Suggest that clients cover their kids' sandboxes to prevent pets from using them as a bathroom.

Promote twice-yearly visits. Remind clients that six month exams help keep their pets—and their family—healthy.

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