E-newsletters promote your practice

E-newsletters promote your practice

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Jan 01, 2006

An e-mail newsletter is an inexpensive way to promote your clinic. To begin:
1. Spread the word. Encourage clients to go online and sign up for your free newsletter. Or send out postcards introducing your Web site and newsletter. The mailer should include your Web address, office address, phone number, and office hours.

Another option is to e-mail clients a letter offering to sign them up for the newsletter. Don't have your clients' e-mail addresses? Assign a staff member to call your client base on a slow day and ask if they feel comfortable sharing their e-mail addresses. And in the future, always take advantage of opportunities to get addresses.

2. Give clients the information they need most. You might include items on pets' seasonal health issues or reminders about basic safety and preventive care. Other simple content ideas:
> announcements for practice events or contests
> a section for puzzles and quizzes
> jokes and short humorous quips
> coupons for your services
> a list of pet shows and events
> a question-and-answer column.

Finally, publish client comments paired with pet pictures. You may need to ask for the first few photos, but once you've begun, you'll have clients eagerly sending in entries. And there is no better spokesperson for your practice than a satisfied client.

Sheila Higgs is a freelance writer based in Plano, Texas and is the author of I've Seen the Clouds, Looking Beyond Hope (New Day Books, 2002).

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