DVMs are happy at work and with life

DVMs are happy at work and with life

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Aug 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff



Yes, we know some of you work too many hours, suffer high stress, and struggle to balance home and work. Yet overall, you're an upbeat group, with 35 percent of respondents to the 2005 Veterinary Economics Job Satisfaction and Professional Outlook Study saying they're very happy with their job, and another 25 percent asserting that practicing veterinary medicine is what they've always wanted to do. So at least 60 percent of you seem happy with your vocation.

Practitioners' positive attitudes may translate to healthy bodies and minds: 90 percent of respondents say they consider themselves emotionally and mentally healthy; 87 percent claim they're physically healthy; and 88 percent find their normal level of stress manageable.


Enjoying a feeling of well-being
Of course, stress control is good news for both your work and your home life. Only 16 percent of respondents say they're divorced, which is far better than the 2000 national average of 41 percent reported by the National Center for Health Statistics.

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