Don't miss follow-ups with veterinary clients

Don't miss follow-ups with veterinary clients

Show your practice's commitment to pet care with a professional post-appointment phone call.
source-image
Dec 01, 2013

I check in with my team frequently to make sure they're doing follow-up phone calls. They are crucial in today's practice environment and a perfect opportunity to open the lines of communication.

Ask questions

When clients leave the clinic, they are often overwhelmed with information, noise and invoices. Use the phone call to see if they have any questions, and fire off some of your own.

Show you care

Follow-up calls are critical to veterinary practice success and client experience. They show you care about clients—not just that $300 invoice. They show your commitment to care.

Learning opportunity

Follow-up calls teach doctors and team members what is and isn't working. For example, if I send a patient home on tramadol for pain medication and the pet is extremely sleepy, I learn that maybe a lower starting dose is needed. Or I send a pet home on prednisone and the patient has a urinary accident, I need to look at the dosage.

Perfect your own follow-up call program at your practice and win the respect of clients.

Veterinary Economics Editorial Advisory Board Member Dr. Jeff Rothstein, MBA, is president of the Progressive Pet Animal Hospitals and Management Group in Michigan.

Hot topics on dvm360

Blog: Election results pose obstacles for veterinary prescription law

Flip in U.S. Senate's majority may slow progress of Fairness to Pet Owners Act.

The war between shelters, veterinarians needs to end

Despite practitioners’ legitimate gripes, they’re hurting themselves.

7 steps to a better relationship between veterinarians and rescue groups

A DVM in the city shares his advice to veterinary practices for working with rescues.

Making it work: Cavanaugh Pet Hospital dedicates itself to a positive, productive shelter relationship

Watch "Moustakas" benefit from Cavanaugh Pet Hospital's partnership with Furry Kids Refuge.

Ebola-exposed dog's first test for the virus is negative

Bentley will continue to be treated with an abundance of caution for the remainder of his quarantine, while his owner has been declared 'virus-free.'