Does your veterinary practice 'like' social media?

Does your veterinary practice 'like' social media?

Our study shows that almost 20 percent more veterinary hospitals are using social media compared with last year. Find out how many of your colleagues are posting their way to a better practice.
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Aug 01, 2011
By dvm360.com staff

Client communication may not be a new concept, but the way you communicate with clients is changing constantly. Back in the day you were only expected to greet clients in person. Now if you aren’t greeting them on Facebook and Twitter, you’re missing out on the chance to strengthen bonds and connect with clients—not to mention you’re passing up free advertising for your veterinary clinic.

New data from the 2011 Veterinary Economics Business Issues Survey shows that more than half of veterinarians have jumped on the social media bandwagon and are using sites like Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn to promote their practices. The rest of you are still living in 2010, when less than a third of veterinarians said their practices participated in social media. See the charts below to check out how the times have changed.

More in this package:
In which social media networks do you individually participate?
In which social media networks does your practice participate?
Who's responsible for posting on and updating your practice's social media sites?
Do you think social media is a vauable tool for your practice?

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