Do your team members think the grass is greener someplace else?

Do your team members think the grass is greener someplace else?

One-third of American workers would switch jobs to get better technology and training.
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Dec 17, 2008
By dvm360.com staff
You know veterinary team members want flexible hours, reasonable pay, and a chance to do good in the animal world. But—surprise—workers in all fields want the chance to work with new technology too. If they don’t, a third of them will go to work for somebody else. That’s the news from a national survey from the Fairfax County Economic Development Authority, a business and technology center in Fairfax, Va.; and the research company Ipsos Public Affairs.

Roughly 80 percent of workers surveyed said they needed modern technology to be creative and productive at work, and that such technology gives their employers an edge. A total of 39 percent surveyed said they’d consider changing employers if it meant the chance to use up-to-date technology. Another 37 percent said they’d switch jobs if better training were offered somewhere else.

“Technology is a measure by which employees assess a company’s commitment to helping them succeed,” says Gerald Gordon, president and CEO of the Fairfax County Economic Development Authority. “At a time of uncertainty in the economy, it’s interesting that employees would move on to a more technology-supportive employer.”

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