A different beat

A different beat

source-image
Jan 01, 2007


Stressed? Dr. Fred Metzger, Dipl. ABVP, owner of Metzger Animal Hospital in State College, Pa., offers this advice: "Go out and buy a set of drums. Sit in your basement and pound on it." Here he's playing with local band Overhead, left to right: Kevin Fagley, Dr. Metzger, Eileen Christman, and Max Magliaro.
I decided to have a midlife crisis with drums and taught myself to play six years ago. I saw a drum kit for sale in the paper and thought, "Well, that's something I've always wanted to do." So I bought it, set the drums up in my basement, and started banging. I loved it.

I put a blurb in our hospital brochure that said I played the drums, and a client of mine who's in a local band, Overhead, saw it and said he was looking for a drummer. I told him I had no experience. He said, "There are only three qualifications: You don't need to make money, you don't need your mother to drive you to practice, and you aren't on drugs or alcohol."

When you're listening to someone else play, you think it's easy. But it's not. The band took me in and really taught me how to play. It has been an interesting trip. Luckily, I've fallen into some nice opportunities. For example, this experience with Overhead set me up for Projectile.


Dr. Fred Metzger (left) is pictured with REO Speedwagon drummer Bryan Hitt (center) and Dr. Dale Peyroux (right).
Don Harris, a veterinarian in Miami and president-elect for NAVC, started the band three years ago. I ran into him at a conference, and he was looking for a drummer.

We primarily play at conferences. We've opened for Chicago, Clint Black, and REO Speedwagon. I've met the drummer for REO Speedwagon, Bryan Hitt, and his drum technician, John Aldridge. He's going to set me up with Todd Sucherman, the fantastic drummer from Styx.

We practice once a year. Ideally, we'd practice every week for six months before a show, but we adapt well. Dr. Angela Lennox from Indianapolis sings and plays keyboards. Dr. Dale Peyroux from Hammond, La., plays bass. And John Sullivan (rhythm guitar), Jamie Carrol (lead guitar), and Jennifer Garrett (vocals), all from Idexx Laboratories, provide our musical backbone. Kevin Vasquez, CEO of Butler Animal Health, plays banjo and also provides backup vocals.

Music takes my mind off of things and opens up a whole different part of my brain.
—Fred Metzger, DVM, DIPL. ABVP

Veterinary Economics presents: The Projectile Project

Wanna be in the band?
Do you dream about bright lights, big crowds, and adoring groupies? Projectile is looking for a lead male vocalist. Do you have what it takes? If so, now's the time to prove it.

The rules

  • You must be a practicing veterinarian or technician.
  • Your tape, CD, or DVD must include a performance of at least two songs from Projectile's playlist. For the band's complete playlist, visit http://www.vetecon.com/vetec/data/articlestandard/vetec/022007/396613/article.pdf.
  • With your audition tape, include your name, address, phone number, e-mail address, and practice name.
  • All entries must be postmarked by May 1, 2007.

Send your audition tapes to:
Veterinary Economics presents:
The Projectile Project
8033 Flint
Lenexa, KS 66214




Drumroll please ...
The top 10 finalists will be notified by July 1, 2007, that they've been picked to audition live with the band at the 2007 CVC Central in Kansas City, Mo. And they'll get 50 percent off of their CVC primary registration fee. The winner will perform live with Projectile at the 2007 CVC West in San Diego.

Hot topics on dvm360

Blog: Election results pose obstacles for veterinary prescription law

Flip in U.S. Senate's majority may slow progress of Fairness to Pet Owners Act.

The war between shelters, veterinarians needs to end

Despite practitioners’ legitimate gripes, they’re hurting themselves.

7 steps to a better relationship between veterinarians and rescue groups

A DVM in the city shares his advice to veterinary practices for working with rescues.

Making it work: Cavanaugh Pet Hospital dedicates itself to a positive, productive shelter relationship

Watch "Moustakas" benefit from Cavanaugh Pet Hospital's partnership with Furry Kids Refuge.

Ebola-exposed dog's first test for the virus is negative

Bentley will continue to be treated with an abundance of caution for the remainder of his quarantine, while his owner has been declared 'virus-free.'