Colors can influence work habits

Colors can influence work habits

Use warm colors to help your employees focus and cool colors to inspire creativity.
source-image
Feb 26, 2009
By dvm360.com staff
If the bland walls in your hospital’s treatment area could use a coat of paint, you may want to consider using a shade of red. And if you want to encourage brainstorming in your conference room, try decorating with blue. According to a new study, certain colors may help your team members perform better.

The study, led by Juliet Zhu of the University of British Columbia, and published in the journal Science, found that the color red causes people to think practically and pay attention to detail, while the color blue sparks creativity and exploration. Zhu concluded that because red typically signals danger, it slows people down, forcing them to pay close attention to tasks. And since people associate blue with the sky, freedom, and peace, they tend to think outside the box when surrounded by the color.

Researchers found these results by showing students images on either a red or a blue screen and documenting their reactions. For example, students shown a brick against a red background tended to list practical uses for the object, like building a house. Sudents shown a brick against a blue background came up with more creative responses, like making a paperweight or building a cat scratching post.

The study focused on hue, so more research on brightness and intensity may be needed. But if you’re looking to brighten up your practice’s walls, choose your colors wisely and you’ll get the most out of your team.

Hot topics on dvm360

Pol on defense as Michigan veterinary board discusses negligence charges

Controversial reality TV veterinarian calls his approach 'common sense.'

Photo gallery: The top 10 veterinary schools in America, according to U.S. News

U.S. News & World Report ranks programs for the first time since 2011.

Front Desk Disasters, Episode 3: Dude looks like a lady

Everyone's favorite receptionist is at it again. Would you handle this situation differently?

Video: Flea hideouts in the house

Parasitology expert Michael Dryden, DVM, MS, PhD, reveals prime hideouts for fleas—and gives tips to clear them out of clients' homes for good.

Veterinarians: Your clients are going to Google with these cat questions

You might be surprised by what your clients are researching. Plus, get an educational client handout.