Client Relations | Veterinary Economics

Client Relations

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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Sep 01, 2005
"The secret to a successful open house," says Christy Johnson, CVPM, practice administrator at Pampered Pet Health Center, "is to make it fun. Have lots of things for clients to see and do, and serve plenty of finger food. Involve your staff, distributors, and drug representatives. And get the word out."
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Sep 01, 2005
I frequently tout the goal of developing a womb-to-tomb relationship with our clients and their pets. At the core of our practice philosophy is the statement, "Focus on long-term relationships versus the short-term dollar."
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Aug 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
Your colleagues generally aren't making tracks to the forefront of technology. Could you benefit from adopting a higher-tech approach?
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Aug 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
Use these strategies to harness your team members' power to drive client compliance and revenue—and improve your patients' health.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Aug 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
Nearly 90 percent of practitioners say they chose veterinary medicine because they wanted to work with animals or liked science and medicine. But, clearly, a human sets up the appointment and writes the check. Here's what you need to know about your clients.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Aug 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
Even Well-Managed Practices aren't seeing many patients for twice-yearly exams—proof that the idea hasn't caught on yet. Use these strategies to educate your clients about the benefits.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Aug 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
Data shows that if your clients arrive during a busy time, their average wait for check-in and check-out can hit 21 to 29 minutes during a 42- to 49-minute visit. That's almost half their time at the practice.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Aug 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
Where you choose to live affects your career opportunities, your personal happiness, and even the health of the patients you see. Does your city rank among the best?
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
Clients often ditch their kids in the reception area. What should we do?
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
Last week a client brought in a very sick pet and refused to treat it because of the cost. This makes me furious. What can I do?
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
Don't settle for just-OK visits anymore. Use these service strategies to take your team's performance up a notch
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
Do I have to be nice if a client is really rude?
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
If dental compliance is a concern at your practice, you're not alone. The team at Lockwillow Avenue Animal Hospital in Harrisburg, Pa., worried that clients didn't always follow their dental recommendations.
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
Picture this: You're explaining why Baxter needs heartworm preventives when the tinny sound of Beethoven's 5th erupts from inside your client's purse.
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
Gina Toman, a Firstline Editorial Advisory Board member and a veterinary assistant at Seaside Animal Care in Calabash, N.C., says that when you do a good job passing the client off to the receptionist after the appointment, you help prevent missed charges and improve the client's experience.