Client Relations | Veterinary Economics

Client Relations

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FIRSTLINE: Dec 01, 2005
Ever wish pets could schedule their own appointments and bring themselves in for care? The key to stopping client-created stress is to see your clients for the different breeds they are—and adjust your approach accordingly.
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FIRSTLINE: Dec 01, 2005
A++ clients make appointments the day they get your postcard, call, or e-mail. Here's how to help the others make the grade.
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FIRSTLINE: Dec 01, 2005
Ever wonder what surgery is like from the pet's perspective? Your clients do.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Dec 01, 2005
"Increased customer loyalty is the single most important driver of long-term profitability," say Scott Robinette, Claire Brand, and Vicki Lenz, authors of Emotion Marketing: The Hallmark Way of Winning Customers for Life (McGraw-Hill, 2000).
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Nov 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
Here's the best way to learn whether you're making the grade on service: Ask. Consider these issues, then visit www.vetecon.com and click on "Forms" to download the sample client survey.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Nov 01, 2005
Solid business ethics can help you establish a profitable, successful practice. And your clients will see your good side, too. Here are seven principles of admirable business ethics:
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Nov 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
Use this sample as a starting point to develop your own survey.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Oct 14, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
"I didn't like boarding my dog in a little cage," says Dr. Henry Inglesby, owner of Suwanee Pet Suites and Animal Care Center in Suwanee, Ga. Assuming other vacationing dog owners also hated the thought of leaving their precious canines in tight quarters, he decided to replace the cramped cages.
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FIRSTLINE: Oct 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
In 23 percent of practices, credentialed technicians are responsible for most of the client's education, according to a recent survey by VetMedTeam.com. In 52 percent of practices, veterinarians handle the bulk of education, while in 19 percent of practices, veterinary assistants take charge of this task. Here's a look at the percentage of respondents who say team members discuss these issues with clients:
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FIRSTLINE: Oct 01, 2005
Gary Morgan, a receptionist for Robert E. Lewis, a dentist in Overland Park, Kan., has a special talent: He remembers the name of most of the clients who walk through the door. And with more than 1,500 client records in the practice database, that's no small feat.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Oct 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
Between 7:30 a.m. and 9 a.m. chaos ruled in the front office at Catawba Animal Clinic in Rock Hill, S.C., says Hospital Administrator Jean Weaver. "All our dental appointments, surgery appointments, daycares, and routine morning appointments were coming in around the same time," she says. "Our receptionists were overwhelmed trying to check in the appointments in a timely manner, especially with clients rushing to get to work."
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FIRSTLINE: Oct 01, 2005
Don't let that next phone call be the client who got away. Use these tips from Sally Hickey, a receptionist at Short Pump Animal Hospital in Richmond, Va.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Oct 01, 2005
Putting his own needs aside, a man risks snaps and bites and offers outcast dogs unconditional love.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Oct 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
October is the second annual National Pet Wellness Month, sponsored by Fort Dodge Animal Health and the AVMA.
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FIRSTLINE: Oct 01, 2005
It only takes a little extra effort to make pet owners feel special. The benefit: happy, loyal clients who appreciate your care.