Client Relations | Veterinary Economics

Client Relations

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FIRSTLINE: Apr 01, 2007
Give your patients a license to board with custom pet ID cards, suggests Collin Babcock, the practice owner and manager at McCune Animal Hospital in Eagle Rock, Mo.
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FIRSTLINE: Apr 01, 2007
By dvm360.com staff
Your practice is unique. Maybe you offer a service others don't, or maybe you just do it better. But if you don’t tell clients why you're so special, they just might miss it. And wouldn't that be a shame?
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FIRSTLINE: Apr 01, 2007
By dvm360.com staff
Use this list of giveaways to boost your marketing reach.
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FIRSTLINE: Apr 01, 2007
Clients love you so much they send you endless photos of Trixie drinking from the toilet and Boots chasing a sunbeam.
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FIRSTLINE: Apr 01, 2007
Your practice isn't a bank, and you're not a loan officer. Use these eight strategies to make sure your practice gets paid for services--so the practice owner can pay you.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Apr 01, 2007
By dvm360.com staff
The team at Ottawa Animal Hospital in Holland, Mich., adopted two groups of solders in Iraq.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Apr 01, 2007
By dvm360.com staff
Long-term drug monitoring doesn't have to be a hassle for you or your clients. With creativity and flexibility, you can win the chance to monitor your patients.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Apr 01, 2007
Referring your clients to certified trainers and behaviorists—and promoting early socialization and training all year long—is the best way to prevent aggression and bites. But National Dog Bite Prevention Week (May 20 to 26) is quickly approaching, so it's a good time to gear up.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Apr 01, 2007
Receptionists who shortchange your relief doctor are shorting your veterinary practice's bottom line.
Apr 01, 2007
Las Vegas — Explain care benefits, cater communication to client personalities and show genuine interest in a pet owner's concerns. These techniques, according to a recent study, ensure pet owners are willing to pay for the highest quality of veterinary care.
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FIRSTLINE: Mar 01, 2007
Want a fun, educational way to jazz up your reception area? Post a quiz on your bulletin board, says Laura Greer, practice manager for Above and Beyond Pet Care Hospital in Lubbock, Texas. Her practice uses quizzes to keep waiting clients informed and entertained. For example: I come in sizes that range from 2 pounds to 200 pounds, and I sweat through my feet. What am I? Answer: a dog.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Mar 01, 2007
I thought I knew what the ideal veterinary client looked like—the one who's willing to pay for the highest level of care. I was wrong.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Mar 01, 2007
We've adopted a major hotel chain's steps for providing excellent client service. Of course, we aren't in the hotel industry, but we are in the hospitality industry.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Mar 01, 2007
By dvm360.com staff
Creating unity among clients whose pets have passed away helps solidify their bond to your practice—and shows great empathy.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Mar 01, 2007
An aging cat taught this doctor how to show compassion to clients with older pets.