Client Relations | Veterinary Economics

Client Relations

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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
Clients often ditch their kids in the reception area. What should we do?
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
Last week a client brought in a very sick pet and refused to treat it because of the cost. This makes me furious. What can I do?
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
Don't settle for just-OK visits anymore. Use these service strategies to take your team's performance up a notch
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
Do I have to be nice if a client is really rude?
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
If dental compliance is a concern at your practice, you're not alone. The team at Lockwillow Avenue Animal Hospital in Harrisburg, Pa., worried that clients didn't always follow their dental recommendations.
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
Picture this: You're explaining why Baxter needs heartworm preventives when the tinny sound of Beethoven's 5th erupts from inside your client's purse.
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
Gina Toman, a Firstline Editorial Advisory Board member and a veterinary assistant at Seaside Animal Care in Calabash, N.C., says that when you do a good job passing the client off to the receptionist after the appointment, you help prevent missed charges and improve the client's experience.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jul 01, 2005
Inundated with signs, slogans, and sales pitches, pet owners may fail to notice a key message that you've posted right in front of them.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jul 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
What steps does your practice team take to support clients after the euthanasia of a pet?
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jul 01, 2005
We took in a boarder from a longtime, good client, who said the pet was a stray that he acquired from the local groomer. During our exam, we found a microchip and were able to locate and contact the original owner, who said the dog had been stolen about six weeks earlier. What are our rights and responsibilities in situations like this?
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jul 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
How well do you treat your clients? A mystery shopper can help you answer this question objectively.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jul 01, 2005
If you're not careful, the hustle and bustle of the day could distract you from communicating your deep caring for clients' pets. To avoid this pitfall, Dr. Jason Palm, of Hiawassee Veterinary Clinic in Orlando, Fla., imagines that every pet he examines is his own.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jun 01, 2005
When a prospective client calls to ask how much I charge for a standard visit, my receptionist explains that my fees vary depending on the nature of the visit. I suspect this answer is driving away clients who are comparing fees as they search for a new veterinarian. Should my receptionist be more specific?
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jun 01, 2005
It was my job to sell pet owners on 1-800-PetMeds. But, the truth is, you're holding the best cards in this game. Just spotlight your strengths: service and value.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jun 01, 2005
At a recent staff meeting, I said I thought it was unprofessional for our medical and administrative support staff to chew gum on the job. I was almost laughed out of the meeting. Was I off base?