Client Relations | Veterinary Economics

Client Relations

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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jan 17, 2008
By dvm360.com staff
Fight misinformation and reward curiosity with a handout that teaches clients to sort fact from fiction on the Web.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jan 01, 2008
By dvm360.com staff
Pet owners are clearly learning about nutrition. But where are they getting their information? Brian Conrad, practice manager at Meadow Hills Veterinary Center in Kennewick, Wash., worries that it's not from you.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jan 01, 2008
They're the situations you dread.
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FIRSTLINE: Jan 01, 2008
Use these tips to tune in to the needs of your clients with disabilities—and help them offer top-notch care for their animal companions.
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FIRSTLINE: Jan 01, 2008
Mrs. Busibodi's eyes say she's examining your tastefully displayed practice brochure, but her dog-like hearing is tuned to eavesdrop so she can catch all the juicy details about Mr. Neverpay's past-due account.
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FIRSTLINE: Jan 01, 2008
By dvm360.com staff
Use this client education form to answer clients' questions about microchips.
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FIRSTLINE: Jan 01, 2008
Q When I discuss client education topics, I feel like clients are tuning me out. How can I make them listen?
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jan 01, 2008
An effective e-mail program gives your practice a high-tech image, says author Ralph Laurie.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jan 01, 2008
By dvm360.com staff
Some clients accept. Some nod a lot and disregard your advice. And some nod a lot, then go home to check for themselves. As frustrating as this last set can be, many pet owners who seek pet health information online are conscientious clients you want to hang onto.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jan 01, 2008
Q. How can I get the most out of my practice's open house?
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jan 01, 2008
By dvm360.com staff
A doctor looks to shorten his ring time.
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FIRSTLINE: Jan 01, 2008
Q How can we prepare clients for unexpected costs that result from problems found during dental cleanings?
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FIRSTLINE: Jan 01, 2008
For clients who believe their pet won't get lost or feel a collar and tag sufficiently identify their pet, Paige Phillips, RVT, a Firstline Editorial Advisory Board member, suggests sharing these examples of how a microchip can save the day—and their pet's life:
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FIRSTLINE: Jan 01, 2008
An angry client taught me to probe deeper to uncover the real reason behind his seemingly unreasonable behavior.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jan 01, 2008
By dvm360.com staff
In the wake of the devastating California wildfires that displaced more than 250,000 people and many more animals, pet owners should be more aware than ever that they need a plan for their animals during an emergency. You can help by getting your clients the information they need.