Client Communication | Veterinary Economics

Client Communication

source-image
FIRSTLINE: Dec 01, 2005
I'm interested in continuing education and more job training, but every time I approach the doctor, she blows me off. What should I do?
source-image
FIRSTLINE: Dec 01, 2005
The veterinarian I work for has anger-control problems. He can be verbally abusive to staff members and sometimes clients. What can I do?
source-image
FIRSTLINE: Dec 01, 2005
Ever wish pets could schedule their own appointments and bring themselves in for care? The key to stopping client-created stress is to see your clients for the different breeds they are—and adjust your approach accordingly.
source-image
FIRSTLINE: Dec 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
In 56 percent of practices, team members begin educating clients about geriatric care when their pets are 7 to 9 years old, according to a recent survey by VetMedTeam.com.
source-image
FIRSTLINE: Dec 01, 2005
Staff members at Danforth Animal Hospital in Edmond, Okla., turned their monthly staff meetings into a roundtable discussion, says Pam Crabtree, RVT.
source-image
FIRSTLINE: Oct 01, 2005
It's hard to find the right words when you're broaching a topic that could spark tempers. Here's help to head off eruptions with co-workers, clients, or the boss.
source-image
FIRSTLINE: Oct 01, 2005
We never have staff meetings, and no one ever knows what's going on in the practice. How can we encourage staff meetings?
source-image
FIRSTLINE: Oct 01, 2005
Favoritism, morale problems, unbearable associates–sometimes the doctor just doesn't see the issue. Use these strategies to clean off the doctor's rose-colored glasses, without making him or her mad.
source-image
FIRSTLINE: Oct 01, 2005
Dr. X is running behind–again. But you don't want to interrupt him in front of the client. Here's an easy solution: Get him a pager. Shelly Hiemer, CVT, a technician at AMVET in Otsego, Minn., says her doctor chose to carry one so staff members could notify him when problems arise without interrupting. Then they developed a message system to indicate the degree of emergency. For example, if the team pages the doctor with number 33, he has 10 minutes to wrap up and get to the next client. Number 66 means he only has five minutes, and 99 means it's an emergency.
source-image
VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Sep 01, 2005
I frequently tout the goal of developing a womb-to-tomb relationship with our clients and their pets. At the core of our practice philosophy is the statement, "Focus on long-term relationships versus the short-term dollar."
source-image
FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
The owner of my practice makes rude remarks about women's work abilities. Should I confront the doctor about his sexist comments?
source-image
FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
My doctor doesn't like to change. How can I make him more open to new ideas and approaches?
source-image
FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
Do I have to be nice if a client is really rude?
source-image
FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
Whether you answer the phone twice a day or twice a minute, these tips will help you handle a range of calls with finesse and keep conflict with clients to a minimum.
source-image
FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
Picture this: You're explaining why Baxter needs heartworm preventives when the tinny sound of Beethoven's 5th erupts from inside your client's purse.