Client Communication | Veterinary Economics

Client Communication

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FIRSTLINE: Jan 01, 2008
By dvm360.com staff
You can safeguard the lives of pets and their families by discussing zoonotic diseases and prevention.
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FIRSTLINE: Jan 01, 2008
Q When I discuss client education topics, I feel like clients are tuning me out. How can I make them listen?
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FIRSTLINE: Jan 01, 2008
Use these targeted tactics to chisel away at team members' bad behavior and heigh-ho poor performance right out of your practice.
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FIRSTLINE: Jan 01, 2008
By dvm360.com staff
We rehired a team member after she had a baby and she's implemented a nursing regimen at work. At lunch, she nurses in her car with her undergarments visible or on the side lawn of the practice parking lot. Then she pumps—in our doctor's office. The rest of the staff is uncomfortable, and we would like to encourage discretion while still supporting her decision to nurse her child. How do I approach this employee?
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FIRSTLINE: Jan 01, 2008
Q How can we prepare clients for unexpected costs that result from problems found during dental cleanings?
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FIRSTLINE: Jan 01, 2008
For clients who believe their pet won't get lost or feel a collar and tag sufficiently identify their pet, Paige Phillips, RVT, a Firstline Editorial Advisory Board member, suggests sharing these examples of how a microchip can save the day—and their pet's life:
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FIRSTLINE: Jan 01, 2008
An angry client taught me to probe deeper to uncover the real reason behind his seemingly unreasonable behavior.
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FIRSTLINE: Jan 01, 2008
It's never easy to be the bearer of bad tidings. But you can ease the hurt clients feel with a sensitive approach. Here's what you need to know to break bad news gently.
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FIRSTLINE: Jan 01, 2008
Q What can we do to gently handle pets with possible pain issues?
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FIRSTLINE: Dec 01, 2007
You're the head technician at a flourishing practice. The hands-on owner is struggling to keep up with his rapidly expanding client base, and he often fails to delegate tasks to his team. Firstline Editorial Advisory Board member Sheila Grosdidier, BS, RVT, a partner with VMC Inc. in Evergreen, Colo., offers this script for addressing the owner, Dr. Committed
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FIRSTLINE: Dec 01, 2007
By dvm360.com staff
Don't get nailed by this tough client question. Learn how to give the answer clients are looking for.
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FIRSTLINE: Dec 01, 2007
By dvm360.com staff
I work at a large practice, and our team members get along well and even socialize outside of work. There's one hitch: One team member practices poor personal hygiene. Periodically, she emits a strong body odor for days at a time. Her team leader approached her when the problem first surfaced, and she improved temporarily. How can we approach her again without embarrassing her--and ourselves?
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FIRSTLINE: Dec 01, 2007
By dvm360.com staff
Six pet owners tell their stories about why they left veterinary practices. Learn from their experiences--then use these tips and tools to avoid critical client care mistakes.
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FIRSTLINE: Dec 01, 2007
I recently discovered I'm pregnant. How do I protect myself and my baby from work-related hazards?
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Oct 01, 2007
Donna was 30 minutes late but finally made it into the exam room with her new puppy, Rudy.