Client Communication | Veterinary Economics

Client Communication

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FIRSTLINE: Oct 01, 2005
Favoritism, morale problems, unbearable associates–sometimes the doctor just doesn't see the issue. Use these strategies to clean off the doctor's rose-colored glasses, without making him or her mad.
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FIRSTLINE: Oct 01, 2005
Dr. X is running behind–again. But you don't want to interrupt him in front of the client. Here's an easy solution: Get him a pager. Shelly Hiemer, CVT, a technician at AMVET in Otsego, Minn., says her doctor chose to carry one so staff members could notify him when problems arise without interrupting. Then they developed a message system to indicate the degree of emergency. For example, if the team pages the doctor with number 33, he has 10 minutes to wrap up and get to the next client. Number 66 means he only has five minutes, and 99 means it's an emergency.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Sep 01, 2005
I frequently tout the goal of developing a womb-to-tomb relationship with our clients and their pets. At the core of our practice philosophy is the statement, "Focus on long-term relationships versus the short-term dollar."
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
The owner of my practice makes rude remarks about women's work abilities. Should I confront the doctor about his sexist comments?
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
My doctor doesn't like to change. How can I make him more open to new ideas and approaches?
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
Do I have to be nice if a client is really rude?
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
Whether you answer the phone twice a day or twice a minute, these tips will help you handle a range of calls with finesse and keep conflict with clients to a minimum.
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
Picture this: You're explaining why Baxter needs heartworm preventives when the tinny sound of Beethoven's 5th erupts from inside your client's purse.
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
The practice owner won't invest in a piece of new equipment that I think we really need. How can I convince her to buy?
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
When you use the title your boss earned, you build respect for your team, increase your authority with clients, and lay the groundwork for a more professional workplace. And that's just for starters
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jul 01, 2005
If you're not careful, the hustle and bustle of the day could distract you from communicating your deep caring for clients' pets. To avoid this pitfall, Dr. Jason Palm, of Hiawassee Veterinary Clinic in Orlando, Fla., imagines that every pet he examines is his own.
Jun 01, 2005
It should be straightforward: You tell your clients what to do, and they do it. Aren't client relations supposed to work this way? After all, you're a doctor, you have command of the English language, and your clients love their cats and want to care for them. Unfortunately, compliance doesn't happen as frequently as we'd like, even with intelligent, committed clients. Reversing this trend means understanding—and eliminating—the reasons for client noncompliance.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: May 01, 2005
If an indoor cat has a low-protein, high-carbohydrate diet and nothing to do, the inevitable will ensue.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Oct 01, 2004
What should I say when clients answer their cell phones during their pets' exams? I think they’d be irritated if I stopped exams to take personal calls.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Aug 01, 2004
Veterinarians should chart the progression a cat may experience while on the diet.