A change is gonna come

A change is gonna come

You know you should make some changes in veterinary practice. We'll show you how.
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May 01, 2013

Whether it's the unfamiliar hallways of a new building, a new team member who's stumbling through the workday, a new piece of equipment you're not sure about, a new rule that's tying your hands, or a new policy you don't agree with, change and adjustment is hard. And what about those changes you know you should make but you just don't? There are always reasons for holding off on what would make your life, your employees' lives, and your clients' lives better.

It'll cost too much. It'll take too long. It'll take too much energy. Take practice software, for example (see Switching up your software). You may be unhappy with your current software, but, holy moly, think of the cost and the trouble of converting and learning a whole new veterinary practice software suite. But what if you really sit down and think over the pros and cons of the change? What if experts could alleviate your concerns about the hurdles and offer tips to make every problem a little easier to manage? Could you make the change you know you need to make? We think you could.

That's why in this issue and in coming issues we'll be including stories from the new "Changemakers" series. We'll include exclusive data from our 2013 dvm360 Change Survey on ways to improve efficiency and client satisfaction and hunt down practicing veterinarians and expert consultants who've made or spearheaded changes—adding wellness plans, expanding weekend hours, offering online scheduling to clients—and lived to tell you about it. At the same time, we'll be looking for practitioners who are ready to make a change and just might—with a little help from their friends (that's us). If you think you might be one of those doctors, email me at
. Let us help you make it easier.

Brendan Howard, Editor

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