Breaking up is easy to do

Breaking up is easy to do

If you keep your veterinary practice vision in mind, brainstorming in small groups could be the answer to (most of) your prayers.
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Feb 01, 2013

There is no doubt in my mind that your team holds the solutions to your clinic's toughest problems and a path to your future success. Small-group discussion and brainstorming is the way to make it happen. Here are the basics:

1. Break out meetings with four to six people are most effective for brainstorming.

2. Create a list of questions you want answered or topics you want discussed.

3. Publicly review the company culture, mission and vision. This is important because as the team begins to create new ideas, they must support the foundation of the clinic.

Here's an example: Let's say we're working toward a paperless practice, so we need to gather more emails and phone numbers in our database. In small-group brainstorming, the team might come up with the idea of a clipboard and sign-in sheet. Yes, that's one possible solution, but our mission says we work to "create an exceptional experience." Going back to the Stone Age with sign-in sheets and clipboards doesn't support the clinic culture—and the future paperless practice. After more deliberation, maybe someone comes up with an idea to use an iPad for clients to review their information. Creating solutions is important, but creating solutions that work with our clinic philosophy is critical. Make sure your team feels safe to voice their opinions in these small groups. Step out of the room so they feel like they can speak bluntly. Great ideas can come out of these meetings if you give the team the space they need and make them feel comfortable.

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