BizQuiz: Would you be prepared if violence erupted at your veterinary practice?

BizQuiz: Would you be prepared if violence erupted at your veterinary practice?

Violent incidents can happen anywhere, but there are things a practice team can do to be less vulnerable.
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Jul 23, 2013
By dvm360.com staff

Take the time. Seibert says a locked door is often the best defense. You may not be able to keep every door locked all the time, but during business hours all doors besides the front entrance should be locked. Installing keyless locks on delivery doors and employee entrances will allow for easy access for staff. Seibert also advises practices to install peepholes in doors that go outside to avoid unintentionally allowing a threat into the practice. This may be especially helpful after hours when practices are extremely vulnerable.

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