BizQuiz: How should you let clients pay? (Answer 4a)

BizQuiz: How should you let clients pay? (Answer 4a)

Nov 20, 2009
By dvm360.com staff

4) A – Incorrect.

Sometimes there are emergencies, and pets that show up at your door require triage help—even if a client can't pay. But in cases that aren't emergencies, giving away services undervalues your work and underestimates your own fixed and variable costs. Dr. Salzsieder says veterinarians are likely to be more lax with record-keeping in free-care situations as well. But when you cut corners to offer some level of care to a client down on his or her luck, that's when your record-keeping and medical justifications are more needed then ever. If a client files a complaint with the licensing board, the board will turn to your records to find out why a pet received less care than normal. If you're sloppy with records when you deviate from your normal high-quality medical protocols, you open yourself up to future legal problems and licensing board penalties when complaints are filed.

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