BizQuiz: Are you behaving well in the exam room? (Answer 1e)

BizQuiz: Are you behaving well in the exam room? (Answer 1e)

Nov 20, 2009
By dvm360.com staff

1) E–Correct.

Those can all be signs of anxiety in a dog. Watch your patients closely for subtle signs such as licking, yawning, drooling, ears held back, looking away, trembling, tail low and tucked, or trembling. Some dogs freeze or stiffen. This absence of movement may not be easy to appreciate but may be the last warning before a serious bite is inflicted. Signs such as crouching, exposing the belly, submissive urination, mouthing, urine marking, lip lifting, raised hackles, escape attempts and growling may indicate a higher level of anxiety and distress. Some dogs display attention-seeking behaviors such as whining, barking, climbing on family members and even mounting.

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