Birth order can determine career choice

Birth order can determine career choice

Sibling rivalry takes on a whole new meaning with a study on careers and earnings.
source-image
Oct 22, 2008
By dvm360.com staff
Younger siblings have it rough. Not only do they get picked on and subjected to hand-me-down clothes and toys, it appears they might earn less money as adults.

A survey by CareerBuilder.com found that workers who were the firstborn in their family were more likely than their siblings to earn $100,000 or more annually. More middle children claimed to earn $35,000 or less than their firstborn or youngest siblings, and last borns were the least likely to report earning six figures.

Along with earnings, it appears birth order can also factor into your career choice. Firstborns tend to pursue careers that require higher education, such as medicine, engineering and law. Middle children often have excellent negotiating and people skills, and they tend to seek work in nursing, law enforcement, and firefighting. Last borns gravitate toward artistic and outdoor jobs, as well as careers in journalism, advertising, and sales.

Only children are similar to firstborns in that they are motivated to conform to parental expectations. Research shows that those without siblings are more confident, articulate, and imaginative than other children. They also hate criticism and tend to be perfectionists.

Hot topics on dvm360

Follow dvm360 on Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest

For quick updates and to touch base with the editors of dvm360, Veterinary Economics, Veterinary Medicine, and Firstline, and check us out on Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest.

Sell veterinary clients on your service

But you don't have to have butler-style service to win new clients and keep existing clients happy.

Why veterinarians should be more like a Louisiana shoeshiner

If my veterinary clients feel half as good as I did after visiting the 'Michael Jordan of shoeshines,' I'll be thrilled.

Texts from your veterinary clinic cat

If your clinic cat had a cell phone and opposable thumbs, what would he or she text you?

Learning goodbye: Veterinarians fill a void by focusing on end of life care

Veterinarians dedicating their careers to hospice and euthansia medicine may be pioneering the profession's next specialty—at clients' request.