Be happy, even if you're not thrilled with your job

Be happy, even if you're not thrilled with your job

Here are tips for making the best out of a less-than-ideal employment situation.
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Jun 18, 2010
By dvm360.com staff

The veterinary industry can be tough sometimes—there are long days, cranky clients, and panicky patients. But if you're unhappy with your current job, here's something to keep in mind: There are plenty of applicants who would love to step in and take over for you. So even if you'd like to find a new position when the economy recovers, here are a few tips from Butler University Executive-in-Residence Marv Recht for finding happiness at work.

> Give your best effort. Performing well and being involved in your work will give you a sense of satisfaction, Recht says. As a bonus, your boss will likely notice your initiative, and you won't have to worry about losing your job.

> Look for new challenges. Tackle a new case, appease a cranky client, or look for ways to increase revenue at your practice. Keep things fresh and exciting, and you'll look forward to going to work.

> Find happiness outside of work. Whether you like to play golf, ski, volunteer for a nonprofit organization, or coach a sports team, keeping yourself busy can take your mind off of how bad things are at work.

How do you find fulfillment at work? See the related links below for more on happiness at work.

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