Be authentic ... don't be yourself

Be authentic ... don't be yourself

Your mental health at your veterinary practice may mean doing things differently.
source-image
Nov 03, 2010
By dvm360.com staff

From childhood on, we are told to be true to ourselves—to be authentic. Paradoxically, that may mean acting in ways we never act, according to new research.

New research published in the Journal of Personality found that participants who tried new ways of acting toward others—like introverts acting extroverted—reported feeling that they were authentically being themselves.

Wake Forest University psychologist William Fleeson says being true to yourself may mean acting counter to your own personality traits and may improve your mood and mental health. In his research, Fleeson found that people who thought of themselves as rude felt more authentic being considerate, and careless people felt more true to themselves when they were conscientious.

Don't get down on yourself, Fleeson says. Change yourself.

Hot topics on dvm360

Blog: Election results pose obstacles for veterinary prescription law

Flip in U.S. Senate's majority may slow progress of Fairness to Pet Owners Act.

The war between shelters, veterinarians needs to end

Despite practitioners’ legitimate gripes, they’re hurting themselves.

7 steps to a better relationship between veterinarians and rescue groups

A DVM in the city shares his advice to veterinary practices for working with rescues.

Making it work: Cavanaugh Pet Hospital dedicates itself to a positive, productive shelter relationship

Watch "Moustakas" benefit from Cavanaugh Pet Hospital's partnership with Furry Kids Refuge.

Ebola-exposed dog's first test for the virus is negative

Bentley will continue to be treated with an abundance of caution for the remainder of his quarantine, while his owner has been declared 'virus-free.'