Bad reception: The veterinary client compliance gap

Bad reception: The veterinary client compliance gap

You think you're broadcasting loud and clear, but pet owners may not be getting the message -- or feeling as though their needs are served. Find out what you can do with this exclusive data from Veterinary Economics and Trone Brand Energy.
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Aug 01, 2012
By dvm360.com staff

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In an era of declining patient visits, veterinarians could use some advice on how to encourage their practice's greatest advocates to tell friends, family, and the world about how great they are. Who better to ask than pet owners themselves?

So Veterinary Economics teamed up with Trone Brand Energy for the 2012 Veterinary Communication Gap Survey. It turns out the way to get great clients to talk you up is twofold: Clients recommend veterinarians when they feel their doctors are "accessible" and "explain things well."

However you work it ... however you adjust ... however you refresh, refocus, and reimagine how your practice could improve, you could do a lot worse than to make yourself and your team 1) more available to clients for their pets' medical needs and 2) communicating what clients need to know and want to know about their pets' medical needs.

Dive into this exclusive survey data for more information on the situation you’re facing as well as what you can do to improve your practice communication. And come back next month for a deeper look into how to bridge your own client communication gaps.

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What you and your clients want to talk about
It's time to revisit your dedication to being clients' go-to source for pet health information. Make sure you solicit questions in the exam room and offer advice and information face-to-face, over the phone, through e-mail, and on your website. Take every opportunity to help pet owners and talk up the topics you think are crucial to pet wellness.

Q. As a pet owner, is it important or very important for you to learn about this topic?
Q. As a veterinary professional, is it important or very important for you to speak to your clients about this topic?



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Q. As a pet owner, is it important or very important for you to learn about this topic?
Q. As a veterinary professional, is it important or very important for you to speak to your clients about this topic?



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Q. As a pet owner, is it important or very important for you to learn about this topic?
Q. As a veterinary professional, is it important or very important for you to speak to your clients about this topic?



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Sources of information
Don't underestimate your importance to clients in the Internet age (they don't). And don't assume clients who investigate pet health answers on the Internet don’t come to see you. Some of your best clients could be web-savvy.



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How you like to talk to clients
Clients remember postcards. But if you're reaching out in other ways, that's just you spinning your wheels if clients don't even remember you talked to them. Do you encourage clients to sign up for your mailing list? What about your newsletter? Your Facebook page? Your Twitter account? If you don't publicize your outreach, you’re talking to no one.


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