Avoiding just one mistake could save you thousands on your building or remodeling project

Avoiding just one mistake could save you thousands on your building or remodeling project

Aug 01, 2006
By dvm360.com staff

And we think you're bound to come away from Veterinary Economics' Hospital Design Conference with ideas that will save you expensive last-minute changes—and even change your thinking about your building project.

How could you not? After all, this is the most comprehensive program on veterinary design in existence. You'll hear from five national veterinary architects and three more professional experts on everything from financing to mechanical systems and flooring.

Here's a really special plus: With your registration, you'll get a 30-minute consultation per practice with an architect to talk about your plans, whether you're at the cocktail napkin stage or arrive with blueprints in hand. You won't get this kind of built-in, one-on-one advice anywhere else.

Not building from the ground up? We organize the program so you can attend the third day as a lab, held in conjunction with CVC Central. On this day, presentations will cover curb appeal, noise control, lighting, and color.

You're preparing to make a big investment in your practice. And this program will help you feel confident that you're spending that money as wisely as possible. Don't miss it!

http://www.cvccentral.com

Hot topics on dvm360

Blog: Election results pose obstacles for veterinary prescription law

Flip in U.S. Senate's majority may slow progress of Fairness to Pet Owners Act.

7 steps to a better relationship between veterinarians and rescue groups

A DVM in the city shares his advice to veterinary practices for working with rescues.

The war between shelters, veterinarians needs to end

Despite practitioners’ legitimate gripes, they’re hurting themselves.

Making it work: Cavanaugh Pet Hospital dedicates itself to a positive, productive shelter relationship

Watch "Moustakas" benefit from Cavanaugh Pet Hospital's partnership with Furry Kids Refuge.

Ebola-exposed dog's first test for the virus is negative

Bentley will continue to be treated with an abundance of caution for the remainder of his quarantine, while his owner has been declared 'virus-free.'