Avoid these six categories of workplace stress

Avoid these six categories of workplace stress

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Mar 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff

Different people find different situations stressful, but some stressors transcend personal differences and affect a majority. Many such key job stresses are associated with these six categories:

1. Task design—heavy workload; infrequent breaks; long work hours; shift work; and hectic and routine tasks that have little inherent meaning, don't use workers' skills, or provide little sense of control.

2. Management style—a lack of participation by workers in decision-making, poor communication within the organization, and a lack of family-friendly policies.

3. Interpersonal relationships—poor social environment and lack of support or help from coworkers and supervisors.

4. Work roles—conflicting or uncertain job expectations or wearing too many hats.

5. Career concerns—job insecurity; lack of opportunity for growth, advancement, or promotion; or rapid changes for which workers feel unprepared.

6. Environmental conditions—unpleasant or dangerous physical conditions such as crowding, noise or air pollution, or ergonomic problems.

Do staff members in your practice face any of these challenges? Could you change your practice or team members' jobs to help avoid these potential problems? What else can you do to ease tension in your practice?

Source: The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

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