Asking the right questions

Asking the right questions

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Feb 01, 2005

It's difficult to really know what a job offers until you've been there a while (Catch-22!), but a little astute questioning can help. Use these questions as aids. Don't read them to prospective employers as a list of demands—gently work them into interviews when appropriate.

Hours and income

  • What exactly are my hours (not the clinic's hours)?
  • Will I get a lunch hour?
  • Will I be on-call?
  • How is my on-call time compensated?
  • Will I have help when I'm on-call?
  • Do you refer to a local emergency clinic?
  • How do you compensate for overtime?
  • Will I receive a guaranteed base pay and be paid on production?
  • Will you teach me the basics of practice economics?

Mentoring

  • How interested in mentoring are you?
  • Do you enjoy mentoring?
  • What day-to-day procedures reinforce mentoring?
  • What role does the practice team play in mentoring?
  • Who can I call when the boss is out of town?
  • How easy is it to refer to or consult with specialists when needed?
  • For how many and what types of surgery will I be responsible?
  • How much time will I be allotted for surgery?
  • Will help be readily available during surgery should it be needed?

Infrastructure
  • How many staff members do you have?
  • What's their training and experience?
  • How many credentialed technicians work at the practice?
  • How many staff members will I work with every day?
  • What are their responsibilities?
  • What are my responsibilities?
  • What types of equipment will I have access to?
  • Can I order drugs and supplies as I need?
  • What are my responsibilities for boarding animals?
  • When will I have time to do my callbacks?

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