Americans' job satisfaction plunges to new low

Americans' job satisfaction plunges to new low

Those without jobs may scoff, but U.S. workers are less content than ever.
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Jan 15, 2010
By dvm360.com staff

A lean economic year may have affected more than just your practice’s revenue—your workers may be down in the dumps too. A new study from the Conference Board research group found that in 2009, just 45 percent of people were satisfied with their job. That figure was down 4 percent from last year and was the lowest level of satisfaction in the 22-year history of the study.

According to the study, only 51 percent of respondents find their jobs interesting, compared to 70 percent in 1987. Workers under 25 were the least satisfied—about 64 percent expressed dissatisfaction with their jobs. Workers between the ages of 25 and 34 were the happiest age group, with 47 percent reporting that they were satisfied with their jobs. Other stats:

> 43 percent of respondents feel secure in their jobs, down from 47 percent in 2008.
> 56 percent of respondents like their co-workers, down from 57 percent in 2008.
> 51 percent of respondents are satisfied with their boss, down from 55 percent in 2008.

Click here for more on the study.

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