AAEP offers free disaster-preparedness advice online

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AAEP offers free disaster-preparedness advice online

Organization urges equine doctors to prepare for hurricane season.
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Sep 15, 2010
By dvm360.com staff

Hurricane season is revving up for the southeast United States, and the American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) is urging veterinarians and horse owners to prepare for severe weather.

Coastal veterinarians and their clients are urged to review their own disaster protocol and the AAEP's own resources with state guidelines for equine evacuation, medical record updates, feed and water supply, emergency rescues, and first aid. Click here for details.

Equine practitioners can also join a nationwide network of responders at the above website.

The Institute for Business and Home Safety also has released tips for disaster preparation for small business owners that can be applied to equine veterinarians facing natural disasters. Here they are:

> Backup your critical medical records in more than one place.

> Know ahead of time how you'll handle employee pay and benefits, cross-train employees to handle more than one job, and provide employees with disaster preparedness information they can use at home.

> Make sure you know how to find necessary medical supplies after a disaster.

> Review your disaster plan regularly to see what works and what doesn't.

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