8 tips for equine veterinarians to keep cool in the heat

ADVERTISEMENT

8 tips for equine veterinarians to keep cool in the heat

Stay cool when you're out on calls with these tips.
source-image
Jul 17, 2012
By dvm360.com staff

The dog days of summer are upon us, and your job as an equine veterinarian requires you to be out and about—no matter what the weather is like. So while you're out taking care of horses, be sure you're also taking care of yourself so you stay cool.

Here are some tips:

  1. Use air conditioning to cool down or go to an air-conditioned building.
  2. Drink plenty of fluids, but avoid caffeine and sugary drinks.
  3. Beat the heat at the end of a long day with a cool shower or and bath.
  4. Take regular breaks from physical activity. Avoid strenuous activity during the hottest part of the day (between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m.).
  5. Wear loose, lightweight, and light-colored clothing to help keep cool.
  6. Stay out of the sun as much as possible.
  7. Wear sunscreen and a ventilated hat (straw or mesh) when you're in the sun, even if it's cloudy.
  8. Check on your neighbors, family and friends, especially those who are elderly or have special needs.

Hot topics on dvm360

Follow dvm360 on Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest

For quick updates and to touch base with the editors of dvm360, Veterinary Economics, Veterinary Medicine, and Firstline, and check us out on Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest.

Sell veterinary clients on your service

But you don't have to have butler-style service to win new clients and keep existing clients happy.

Why veterinarians should be more like a Louisiana shoeshiner

If my veterinary clients feel half as good as I did after visiting the 'Michael Jordan of shoeshines,' I'll be thrilled.

Texts from your veterinary clinic cat

If your clinic cat had a cell phone and opposable thumbs, what would he or she text you?

Learning goodbye: Veterinarians fill a void by focusing on end of life care

Veterinarians dedicating their careers to hospice and euthansia medicine may be pioneering the profession's next specialty—at clients' request.