6 tips for spring cleaning in your veterinary practice

6 tips for spring cleaning in your veterinary practice

Now's the time to clean and declutter. Here are a few easy ways to get started.
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Apr 01, 2011
By dvm360.com staff

The warming weather means the time for spring cleaning is just around the corner. Use this time of year as an opportunity to de-clutter and de-junk your veterinary practice—your team members and clients will thank you. Here are some tips for getting rid of unnecessary clutter in your practice:

> Donate or recycle old computers and other electronics.
> Get rid of your big, clunky filing cabinets and go paperless with document management software and desktop scanners.
> Shred your old documents and paper files.
> Setup desk organizers to organize and paper files or documents you must keep.
> Reduce, reuse and recycle with recycling cans.
> Remove dust and coffee ring stains from your desk.

Now that you’ve de-cluttered your practice, what do you do with the extra space? Consider adding in new furniture to create an inviting atmosphere for your clients. Add a water cooler in place of a filing cabinet and bring in small plants to brighten up the office and clean up the office air.

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