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6 books to spark an interest in equine veterinary medicine

We found a half-dozen kids' books that highlight equine medicine or equine veterinarians. Can you find more?
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Feb 14, 2012

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mollythepony

 

If you want to help the young generation see that equine veterinarian is a great career and that the equine veterinarian is a crucial partner in a horse owner's life, I'm here to tell you: It ain't easy to do it with books.

We were recently sent a review copy of the new picture book My Horse Has Five Hearts. That sent us hunting for more books about equine veterinary topics for pint-sized horse lovers, and we were surprised at how few we could find on the Internet.

So, here are the six kid-friendly books and series that we could find that include equine medicine or equine veterinarians as an important part of the action.

Know of any more? Please email bhoward@advanstar.com.

Molly the Pony: A True Story

by Pam Kaster
(2008, Louisiana State University Press)

Molly's a bit of a hero horse, braving both Hurricane Katrina and a vicious dog bite that required her leg to be amputated. But equine veterinarians come to the rescue, with a prosthetic limb that keeps Molly alive and on her feet.

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myhorsehasfivehearts

My Horse Has Five Hearts

by Kymberly T. Lee (author)
and Rusty Fletcher (illustrator)
(2011, Gesund Inc.)

Dr. Robert Hunt at Hagyard Equine Medical Institute in Lexington, Ky., thinks every equine veterinarian needs this book in their waiting room—if you have one—and who are we to disagree?

The 18-page picture book explains hooves' crucial role in keeping a horse's blood flowing. Pictures show the difference between healthy hooves and unhealthy ones and explain how hoof maintenance and weight control are so important for equine health.

Another page shows a farrier working on a horse's hoof and an equine veterinarian checking the horse's heartbeat: "Just like we need experts to help us stay healthy," reads the text, "... to be at his best, our horses need experts too."

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marestale

The Mare's Tale

by Darrel Odgers and Sally Odgers (writers),
and Janine Dawson (illustrator)
(2009, Kane/Miller )

Book two in the "Pet Vet" series, The Mare's Tale follows veterinarian Dr. Jeanie and her animal-savvy assistant, Trump the dog, as they navigate a rough night at the veterinary clinic: "Take Helen the mare, for example ... we were helping her to have a foal, but a big storm, a silly human, and sick dalmatians kept distracting us!"

Bet you wish you had talented team members who happened to be four-legged, too.

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saddleclub

The Saddle Club

by Bonnie Bryant
(1986-2001, Yearling)

This popular series spawned three book series and a TV show. Three girls—introduced to us at ages 12, 13, and 13—find friendship and support from each other at their favorite place, Pine Hollow Stables. Ever notice how so many of these horse tales never show a veterinarian in their dramas? Not this one. "Saddle Club" books often include recurring character Dr. Judy Barker, the veterinarian on hand to take care of most Pine Hollow horses.

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trickster

Trickster

by Laurie Halse Anderson
(2008, Puffin)

Whoa! A book with a boy horse lover and veterinarians? Say no more! In this third book in the "Vet Volunteers" series, pre-teen volunteer David—who's got a reputation as a troublemaker—decides he's going to help wild Trickster recover from a painful accident. Will bad boy David and Trickster make a good team? Who cares? While David tries, he'll be showing off how cool it is to work with veterinarians and horses.

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wonderhorse

Wonder Horse: The True Story of
the World's Smartest Horse

by Emily Arnold McCully
(2010, Henry Holt)

In the 1800s, a veterinarian and former slave, Bill "Doc" Key, shows off a horse he thinks is brighter than the average equid. Some people think it's a scam, so Dr. Key goes on to try to prove that treating a smart horse well can really pay off.

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