5 things your clothes reveal about you

5 things your clothes reveal about you

What you wear reflects your character, says CVC speaker Shawn McVey.
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Aug 23, 2012

First impressions are key to keeping clients coming back and Shawn McVey, MA, MSW, Veterinary Economics Editorial Advisory Board member and owner of McVey Management Solutions in Chicago, says 79 percent of the first impression is accounted for by appearance and body language. He says people make many initial assumptions and your clothes can reveal these five things about you:

1. Self-esteem: McVey says how you dress is your love of self made tangible to the world.

2. Self-respect: Not only what you wear but how you wear it shows how much respect you have for yourself. Not many people are the "perfect shape or size" but those who respect themselves minimize weaknesses and maximize strengths.

3. Confidence: Even if you aren't confident, you can use clothes to fake confidence that you lack.

4. Organizational skills: A neat and orderly uniform can portray how analytical you are--or it can atleast help you create an image of being organized.

5. Soundness of judgement: Knowing what is appropriate to wear shows maturity and respect for clients and coworkers.

McVey says to keep in mind how much your clothes and your employees clothes say about the practice.

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