5 negotiation tips to take to the bank

5 negotiation tips to take to the bank

Planning to make a large purchase for your veterinary practice? Don't ignore the important act of sweet-talking.
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Oct 12, 2011
By dvm360.com staff

That digital radiography system looks nice, but wouldn’t it look even nicer with a price reduction? As retailers and service providers continue to look for new ways to recover from the recession, it’s important for consumers to understand that negotiating is almost always appropriate. “Price, terms, perks, or extras—most of the time they’re there if you just ask,” says Charles Lankau, a business professor at Wake Forest University.

Nervous about asking for a deal? For those new to bargaining, consider the following tips:

1. Give yourself permission to negotiate. Bargaining is one of many valuable budget-stretching tools at your disposal. Use it.

2. Focus on the result, not on any misplaced embarrassment for asking. Think of how good it will feel to get something for your efforts. Any success you find will probably create a win-win situation—the seller will likely still make a profit.

3. Touch a chord. Choose your words carefully to reach the emotional side of the person you’re dealing with. For example, you might say, “I’m just not sure I can afford this. Can you do any better?”

4. Practice. Keep trying, and your asking technique will improve.

5. Track your results. Keep a note card in your car’s glove box and jot down every time you purchase an item for less than the asking price. It adds up. Seeing your savings grow is a great motivator.

Whether you’re buying a piece of equipment for your veterinary hospital or a car for yourself, mastering the art of negotiating can lead to big savings. And all you have to do is ask.

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