5 client relationship-building strategies

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5 client relationship-building strategies

Make your practice a standout by talking—and listening—more to your clients.
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Feb 01, 2011
By dvm360.com staff

1 Communicate often. Do you communicate with clients only with appointment reminder postcards? Build a stronger relationship with horse owners by providing educational material such as newsletters or information bulletins in print or via e-mail.

2 Build two-way communication. Actively listening is just as important as speaking. Develop a website and provide an e-mail address so clients can contact you without calling.

3 Hold special events. Have an open house once a year or participate in community events such as golf tournaments, fundraisers, and picnics. Make sure everyone knows who you are and what you do. Show them that you're approachable.

4 Provide superior customer service. Make your clients' concerns your top priority. Return phone calls promptly. Process paperwork in a timely manner. Smile when answering the phone. Never sound as if you are too busy to listen.

5 Be multicultural. Hire someone at your practice who can speak Spanish, or have someone available to translate on an as-needed basis. Learn more about the other cultures represented in your community.

Adapted from information on http://Entrepreneur.com/.

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