4 ways to welcome new clients

4 ways to welcome new clients

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Oct 01, 2010

Make sure you're providing new clients with reasons to come back and signs of your commitment to their pets. Try these tips:

Hand out new patient folders. Give a folder to all new clients with information about your clinic and your practice philosophy. Include a few key handouts, but don't overwhelm them with too much information. Let them know they can use the folder to keep their medical records organized and in one place. Read how one practice uses binders for this at http://dvm360.com/wellnessbinders.

Give a welcome call or send a welcome letter. Bond your new clients by making sure they know they're special. New clients especially appreciate a call from the manager. This sets the tone that you're interested in providing good care.

Put up a puppy and kitten bulletin board. Take pictures of all new puppies and kittens and post them on your board in the reception area. Give the photos to your clients on their last puppy or kitten visits.

Celebrate each pet. Send home a treat for the pet—for new clients and existing ones. A toy, a snack, or a bandana puts a smile on the pet parent, and a happy pet parent is a happy client.

Veterinary Economics Editorial Advisory Board member Dr. Jeff Rothstein, MBA, is president of Progressive Pet Animal Hospitals in Michigan.

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