3 ways to praise veterinary employees like a pro

3 ways to praise veterinary employees like a pro

Thanking and rewarding employees can give your business a boost.
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Nov 26, 2012
By dvm360.com staff

Don’t hold off until annual performance reviews to praise stellar veterinary team members. A simple “thank you” here and there can boost efficiency and even help your business make more money. According to new research published in an Inc.com article, companies that excel at employee recognition are 12 times more likely to generate strong business results than those that do not. The study, conducted by Bersin & Associates, found in companies focused on rewarding their workers, employee engagement, productivity, and customer service were about 14 percent better than in those that skimp on recognition. Here are three tips to praise employees:

1. Be specific and know your people. Most employees would enjoy a personal thank-you note, but they want it customized to them. For example, to say, “You’re doing a good job,” is fine for a “social” thinker, but a “structural” thinker doesn’t trust you unless you add a specific task he has accomplished.

2. Consider the delivery. The way a thank you comes across is just as important as the thank you itself. Every employee responds differently to recognition. Many appreciate public praise. Others cringe if they’re made the center of attention. Know your employees and tailor your recognition so it produces the greatest impact.

3. Get everyone involved. Highlight the achievements of team members at the monthly staff meeting. Lively presentations that include photographs, videos, and client comments make this one even better.

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