3 tips for veterinary callback success

3 tips for veterinary callback success

Follow-up phone calls show clients you care and are crucial to building trust.
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Dec 18, 2013

Even if your doctors or team members already make some follow-up calls, chances are that there is room to improve or expand the program so that it's more comprehensive and consistent. Here are the follow-up calls I call crucial:

>All clients whose pets visited the day before. Check to see if they have any questions or concerns following that visit.

>All clients whose pets underwent surgical or dental procedures three days before. You checked in with them on day one at home already, but many surgical and dental issues don't develop right away.

>All clients with recent medical cases. The time frame varies based on the medical issue. For example, a patient with vomiting and diarrhea may be called back in three days and, if not improved, needs to be brought back for a recheck. A dermatitis case might be called back for a status update a week after the visit. These can often be automated as well. Otherwise, doctors need to enter the follow-up calls in the practice software or ask team members to do it.

This may sound like a lot of work, but if you're passionate about quality of care and client experience, I believe these follow-up calls are necessary.

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