12 habits of highly effective employees

12 habits of highly effective employees

Encourage your veterinary team to be more productive. You might learn a thing or two yourself.
source-image
Aug 22, 2012
By dvm360.com staff

If you want to encourage your veterinary team members to be more productive, take note of the tasks high-functioning, productive, and more awake employees have completed before lunch, according to businessinsider.com:

  1. Make a work to-do list the day before. Many swear by having a written to-do list, but not everyone agrees on when you need to compose it. The opportune time to plan a day’s tasks is the night before. That way, employees don’t lose any office time in the morning, plus it’ll help them sleep better.
  2. Get a full night’s rest. Lack of sleep affects employees’ concentration levels, and therefore, productivity. Most experts advise getting a minimum eight hours of shut-eye each night.
  3. Avoid the snooze button. Petitioning for nine more minutes, then nine more, then another nine is a slippery slope. This ultimately it also leads to lateness. To avoid it, set the alarm clock a little bit earlier, and get out of bed on the first alarm.
  4. Exercise. Schedule a Pilates class for the a.m. instead of after work. Exercise improves mood and energy levels. Not only that, but there have been studies done on employees who've exercised before work or during the work day. Those employees have been found to have better time-management skills, and an improved mental sharpness. Those same studies found these workers are more patient with their peers.
  5. Practice a morning ritual. Institute a morning routine aside from an exercise routine. Whether you opt to meditate, read the newspaper, or surf the Web, it’s important to have that quiet time.
  6. Eat breakfast. Food provides the fuel employees need to concentrate, and breakfast is particularly important since it recharges the body after it has fasted all night. Munch on something light and healthy in the morning, and avoid processed carbs that could zap energy.
  7. Arrive on time. Getting a full night’s rest and keeping fingers off the snooze button should make this a cakewalk. Allot a safe amount of time to make it to work on schedule.
  8. Check in with the boss and/or employees. Good workers set priorities that align with their company’s goals, and they’re transparent about their progress.
  9. Tackle big projects first. Dive right into work upon arriving and start with the hardest tasks. Don't jump into meaningless projects.
  10. Avoid morning meetings. If you have any say on meeting times, schedule them in the afternoon. An employer who schedules morning meetings could rob his or her employees of their peak performance. The exception to this is if your meeting is the most important task of the day.
  11. Allot time for following up on messages. Discern between mindless email or voicemail checking and conducting important business. Checking the inbox every couple of minutes takes time away from important tasks. Instead, set a schedule to check and respond to email in increments. Consider doing so at the top of each hour, to ensure that clients and colleagues receive prompt responses.
  12. Take a mid-morning break. Stretch or indulge in a little Internet surfing. It’s actually good to zone out on Facebook and Twitter or send a personal text message or two. Employees should take 10-minute breaks occasionally.

Hot topics on dvm360

Dog of Dallas Ebola patient will not be euthanized, authorities say

Health officials have quarantined and will monitor dog and amid concerns surrounding deadly virus.

Video: How to perform a belt-loop gastropexy

Prevent GDV in your at-risk patients with this simple technique.

Stretch your skills to earn more in veterinary practice

Finding new tasks could be the key to generating more income for your practice—and boosting your pay.

Veterinary community stunned by Sophia Yin's unexpected death

Prominent veterinary behaviorist died of suicide Sept. 28.

Study shows sustained salary slump for veterinary support staff

Since 2009, technicians paid by the hour have experienced a bump in pay, but pay for other team members has stayed stagnant, according to data from the 2014 Firstline Career Path Study. Here’s a look at changes in team pay from 2009 to 2013.